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My late husband’s favorite grace, recited with a Scottish burr and good whiskey in hand:

A Selkirk Grace

 Some hae meat and cannae eat.

Some nae meat but want it.

We hae meat and we can eat

and sae the Lord be thankit.

Translated: Some have meat and cannot eat. Some no meat but want it. We have meat and we can eat and so the Lord be thanked.

Jean M. Yarbrough is Professor of Government and Gary M. Pendy, Sr. Professor of Social Sciences, with teaching responsibilities in political philosophy and American Political Thought. She has twice received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, first in 1983-84, when she was named a Bicentennial Fellow and again in 2005-2006, under a "We the People" initiative. She is the author of American Virtues: Thomas Jefferson on the Character of a Free People and is editor of The Essential Jefferson. She is a contributor to the Claremont Review of Books.

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