Discourses

In his State of the Union President Trump seized the moral high ground in the on-going argument over the crisis, indeed, the national emergency, on our southern border.  The key moment in his powerful speech came when the President directly addressed the border crisis by declaring:

“This is a moral issue. The lawless state of our southern border is a threat to the safety, security, and financial wellbeing of all America. We have a moral duty to create an immigration system that protects the lives and jobs of our people.”

These words are a full-throated articulation of American constitutional morality. The sacred duty of our elected officials is to ensure that the safety and well-being of Americans comes before any other considerations. In Federalist No 3, Publius stated: “Among the many objects to which a wise and free people find it necessary to direct their attention, that of providing for their Safety seems to be the first.”

Turning the tables on the hypocritical open-borders “moralists” in Congress and in the donor class, President Trump explains how “tolerance for illegal immigration” is “not compassionate” but “very cruel” because it hurts vulnerable American workers. In other words, it hurts the least among us. While his opponents seek to cripple our brave border patrol agents, the President asks Congress to defend America’s national border “out of love and devotion to our fellow citizens and our country.” Masterful, Mr. President.

is a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute and the author of Sovereignty or Submission, winner of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute book award for 2012.

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Forgetting the Founders: The 2020 Democratic Field

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discourse

The German Stamp on Wilson’s Administrative Progressivism

Paul Gottfried questions the connection between the American Progressives and German political thought—Hegel’s in particular. I’m not quite sure what he means by the “cottage industry” he attributes to me, but it is the case that this connection is an important piece of arguments made about the Progressives by me, John Marini, and others in…

discourse

How “German” Were the Progressives?

Contrary to James Poulos and Glenn Ellmers writing in The American Mind, I did not produce a “mixed review” of John Marini’s excellent study of the American administrative state. I extolled Marini’s examination of our increasingly unaccountable centralized state and was especially drawn to his focus on Congress’s role in this misfortune. But I part…