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What is most significant for our country’s future is how we understand the liberty and equality that forms us and how much we can preserve the natural sources of happiness in family and friendship. On these depend our individual virtues and our appreciation of the worth of free speech and a free economy. A single midterm election will not affect this very much, although we tend to over-interpret immediate results. It will be good for the country that Republicans will continue to be able to confirm judges, and good as well if they can recapture in 2020 voters lost in 2018. It would be useful too if the less-extreme Democrats moderated the others, although the allure of confronting the administration and maneuverings among prospective Presidents make this unlikely. The country needs two sensible parties, and the extremism of so many Democrats is our most obvious political concern.

is the Fletcher Jones Professor of Political Philosophy and director of the Salvatori Center for the Study of Individual Freedom in the Modern World at Claremont McKenna College, and a fellow of the Claremont Institute.

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Ethics and Metaphysics at Princeton in 1750s-60s

Here’s a taste of what you had to be able to argue (in Latin) in order to graduate from Princeton in order to graduate back in the day. Robby George would (no doubt gladly!) find himself the leebearal on campus… ETHICS, 1762 1. The highest perfection of men depends on their liberation from all sin….

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Ethics at Harvard, 1810

In the founding era, one graduated by means of a scholastic practice in which seniors argued various propositions (in Latin) in a public forum. These lists of theses give one a sense of what the institution thought, as an institution, ought to be taught to all of its students. Here’s the “Ethics” section for Harvard…

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Post-Midterms: The Democratic Party’s Radicalized Foreign Policy

Thanks to the methodical takeover of its party institutions and non-profits by an energized philanthropic project beginning after John Kerry’s loss in the 2004 presidential election, the Democratic Party has undergone what can only be described as a radicalization process. After the donor class moved leftward, a new, woke generation—concerned with microaggressions, social justice, and…