Discourses

The results of the 2018 midterm elections can be considered a draw.

For the Democratic Party, their hopes of a Big Blue Wave representing a repudiation of President Trump failed to materialize. Instead, they performed well within the norm for the opposing party in the midterm elections of a new president.

For the Republicans, facing a favorable map with a host of Democratic incumbents in States carried handily by President Trump in 2016, a slightly expanded Senate majority is merely a passing grade. They left a lot of money on the table.

In the final analysis, the split indecision (if I may call it that) is merely a manifestation of the failure of both parties to fully and clearly articulate a vision for America’s future and to persuade the American people of the goodness and justness of that vision.

is director of academic programs at the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation. He is the editor of several books and a past Lincoln Fellow of the Claremont Institute.

More Thoughts

discourse

The Administrative State’s German Roots

James Poulos is very fair-minded in his treatment of Paul Gottfried’s “mixed” review of John Marini’s new book. Gottfried wrote: According to Marini, “contemporary ideology and politics become intelligible only with reference to a philosophy of history, which originated in the political thought of Kant and Hegel.” As someone who has written on both German…

discourse

Up From Administration

Must we reconcile ourselves to the federal bureaucracy? Paul Gottfried’s mixed review of Claremont senior fellow John Marini’s summa on unconstitutional government, Unmasking the Administrative State, leaves the reader with the more than sneaking suspicion that the answer is yes. “It represents a dramatic departure from what our federal union was intended to be, and…

discourse

David Brooks’s “Case” for Reparations

David Brooks’s New York Times piece, “The Case for Reparations,” is so dumb, irresponsibly emotive, and wrong in both its premises and conclusions, that it deserves a section-by-section commentary. Brooks: …So let’s look at a sentence that was uttered at a time when the concept of sin was more prominent in the culture. The sentence…